HIKING/BIKING

Hike Photo 1 Hike Photo 2 Hike Photo 3 Hike Photo 4 Hike Photo 5


5 backpackers (including myself) went up Mount Marcy on Sunday July 31, 2005 after establishing base camp on Saturday July 30 somewhere on the western slopes of Phelps Mountain.

Marcy dome from Little MarcyMarcy dome from Little Marcy Mt. Colden w/ Algonquin behind
Mount Colden in foreground with Algonquin just behind it. Phelps Creek, near our basecamp
Phelps Creek near our basecamp.

Please click HERE to see pictures of our backpack
up to the peak of Mount Marcy.

On Sunday July 18, 2004 I rode in the Harlem Valley Rail Ride which is put on by the same folks who bring us the Five Borough Bicycle Tour. There were 17, 30, 50, 62 and 75 mile runs going on, and I did the 30 mile due to a "lapse" in my training. I had hoped to do the 50, but... c'est la vie. Next year I do the 50.
Sydney or the Bush!

UPDATE! I did the Twin Lights Tour in September of 2005, and succeeded in completing 50 miles.
It wasn't the easiest ride for me, but I did finish under my own power.

Sunday May 1, 2005, was the BIKE NEW YORK 5 Borough Bicycle Tour . The weather was a little "damp" in the beginning... well actually it rained. But the rain let up at around 9 A.M. or so. I finished with an elapsed time of about 3:52:00 for the 42 miles. My total time was about 4:20:00 counting a couple of rest stops and a "buddy search".
Here are a few photos from the ride. That's me first at a rest stop around the 20 mile mark, and then at the end of the tour at Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island. The "ferry" picture was taken sometime around 5:40 A.M. somewhere in New York Harbor between Staten Island and lower Manhattan.

BNY05_Photo_1 BNY05_Photo_2 BNY05_Photo_4 BNY05_Photo_3 BNY05_Photo_5


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Saturday, June 5, 2004 we did our old favorite "Burroughs Range" hike which is considered the toughest day hike in the Catskills. We started up Wittenberg Mountain around 9:30 A.M. From there we went on to Cornell, and finally Slide Mountain for a total of about 10 miles horizontal. The weather held until we got on the backside of Slide. Then, the skies opened up and we were ankle deep in water coming down the front side (western) of Slide. I didn't bring my camera due to the threat of inclement weather, but the views off of Wittenberg were fantastic, as usual.
16 days later, my son and I went back up Slide Mountain, and scooted about 100 feet (vertically) and about 1/4 mile down the backside of Slide to the top of the upper staircase. (Those of you who have made the journey know what I mean). Here is a great view of Wittenberg and Cornell from that perspective.

Wittenberg and Cornell

Wittenberg on the left and Cornell on the right, Monday June 21, 2004 around 1 P.M. E.D.T.

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Tremper Mountain along the Phoenicia trail. Looking North on the Hudson from Saugerties


On the left is a photo I took near the peak of Tremper Mountain on Sunday Nov. 3, 2002.

Here are more pictures from the Phoenicia Trail on Mt. Tremper. Click Here And Here!

On the right is a photo I took from the trail to the Saugerties Lighthouse on Monday June 2, 2003 around 1:35 P.M.
The view is looking north up the Hudson River toward Catskill. Below are a few more photos from the Saugerties Lighthouse trail, including the lighthouse itself.


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Here are more photos from the Saugerties Lighthouse The Lighthouse is located where the Esopus Creek flows into the Hudson River.
It is a peaceful place to spend a lunch hour, the day or a weekend.

SaugertiesLight01 SaugertiesLight03 SaugertiesLight04 SaugertiesLight05 SaugertiesLight06

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MH ADK Logo The following list is from Rick Taylor, former ADK Mid-Hudson Chapter Outings Chairperson.

The Mountaineers of Seattle, Washington produced the original list of Ten Essentials years ago.
This is my version of the essential items. If you think I left an item off let me know;
weíll add it next time. It is not a rigid list. Many items here are overkill for a walk
in the park while they are totally appropriate for a strenuous outing in the backcountry.
Regardless of the type or level of the outing, the appropriate items are to be carried
by both the leader and participants. The key is to keep each item small/compact and in your pack.

Rick Taylor



I have updated the list, inserted some comments and added a few new items. The one item not listed is a pack, large enough to hold everything that should be carried.
1. Water:
(2) Quart minimum. More is better, particularly during hot weather and the winter months when fluid loss is heightened.

2. Food:
Lunch and Snacks. Extra goodies are a good idea on longer/more strenuous
outings when there could be a delay in returning to the trailhead.

3. Extra Clothing:
Rain shell (gore-tex or coated nylon) and synthetic shirts, sweaters and/or vests that fit underneath the shell.

4. Map:
Use a tyvek version or enclose your map in a zip lock bag.
Know how to read the map and know where you are on the map at all times.

5. Compass:
A simple protractor (base plate) model such as the Silva Polaris Type 7 with a neck cord.
Additionally, the neck cord is a good place for a whistle.

6. Lighting:
A flashlight is good but a small, lightweight headlamp is better particularly during the winter season.
Donít forget extra batteries and bulb.

Tip: A compromise is the new version of the Princeton Blast flashlight which clips
onto the bill of your hat to function like a headlamp. Otherwise it fits easily in your hand.

7. First Aid Kit:
Keep it simple, compact and weatherproof. Obtain the know how to use all the components properly.
Purchase a commercial model or assemble basic components yourself and store in a freezer strength
one-zip quart size bag. Your first aid knowledge is the single most important component.

8. Matches:
"Strike anywhere" matches in a waterproof container or a box of waterproof
matches in a plastic bag to keep the striker surface dry.

9. Fire Starter:
A commercial product or just one or two candles off your last birthday cake stored in a zip lock bag.

Tip: A two-ounce naglene bottle makes a good container to store both matches and small candles in.
The side of the bottle is just the right size to wrap duct tape around.

10. Knife:
A small single blade knife, like the Victorinox classic, is sufficient. Larger Swiss Army knives and leatherman
type tools are more practical for your winter pack when repairs to snowshoes, crampons, and ski binding are encountered.

11.Common Sense:
The willingness to turn around when the weather turns on you, the groupís energy level wanes
or darkness threatens. Choose a hike length and level or difficulty that is within your ability.
Carry food and clothing appropriate for the seasonal climate and not just according to the weather forecast.

12. Duct Tape:
The Number One repair item that can do double duty as the tape in your first aid kit.

13. Heavy Duty Trash Bag:
Use a 3-millimeter contractor grade trash bag (Home Depot) as a pack liner, pack cover,
emergency bivy sack and even for collecting trash along the trail.

14. Sun Protection:
Hat with brim, sunglasses, sun block and lip balm. These become more necessary when
snow cover reflects the bright sun, youíre traveling above timberline, or your paddling.

15. Foam Pad:
A small scrap of an old ensolite pad makes a nice butt pad during lunch breaks, particularly
when sitting on wet rocks/logs or in snow. Additionally it is quite useful in first aid situations
such as immobilizing an injured ankle.

16. Attitude:
A positive attitude is the ultimate essential.





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